Thursday, 26 June 2014

Tour stars to parade through Leeds to arena opening ceremony


Caption: Leader of Leeds City Council Cllr Keith Wakefield (centre left) with executive member for digital and creative technologies, culture and skills Cllr Lucinda Yeadon (centre right) with local cycle riders who will be taking part in the parade including 10-year-old Elora Foley (front, wearing Leeds: Cycling Starts Here t-shirt)

The superstars of the Tour de France will ride through Leeds city centre next week as they make their way to the official Opening Ceremony Team Presentation.

As part of the build-up to the Grand Départ of this year’s race, all 198 competing riders will take part in a public parade riding from the University of Leeds to Leeds Arena on the evening of Thursday 3 July.

Starting just after 6pm, the 22 teams will ride along a route from the university into the city centre taking in Millennium Square as they make their way to the Leeds Arena for the spectacular Opening Ceremony and Team Presentation of this year’s Tour.
The parade will give cycling fans and the public the chance to see all of the riders in action two days before the race begins for real on The Headrow in Leeds on the morning of Saturday 5 July.

The parade will be led by a group of cyclists from local Leeds clubs and community groups who will be first on to the route which begins at the top of Calverley Street. The route heads down alongside Leeds General Infirmary before the riders turn left sweeping across Millennium Square in front of the Civic Hall. Turning left again the route then heads up Upper Cookridge Street before crossing Clay Pit Lane and turning right onto Merrion Way before a final left turn takes them into the Leeds arena.

The Tour riders will then follow, riding in their teams at regular intervals. Aside from the riders, the parade will also feature team support cars and some of the Welcome to Yorkshire Grand Départ vehicles which will be part of the Tour’s famous publicity caravan offering a further taster of what is to come on the Saturday.

Organised by Leeds City Council and Tour organisers Amaury Sport Organisation (ASO), the parade is free for the public to attend and it is hoped spectators will flock to Millennium Square and Cookridge Street in particular.

The short journey will take the Tour stars to the council-owned Leeds Arena where they will be officially introduced to the audience at the Opening Ceremony and Team Presentation.

The spectacular show organised by Welcome to Yorkshire will be a first of its kind for the Tour, with the presentation of the teams alongside live entertainment by Embrace, Alistair Griffin and Kimberley Walsh performing the official anthem of Yorkshire’s Grand Départ ‘The Road’ plus Hope & Social and Opera North. For information and ticket details for the event, go to www.letouryorkshire.com/openingceremony

In order to stage the riders’ parade, a number of road closures and parking restrictions will be in place in Leeds on Thursday 3 July. These can be seen below and also at leeds.gov.uk/granddepartleeds.

Roads will begin to be closed from 4pm. The final closure at the junction of Woodhouse Lane and Clay Pit Lane will be in place at 5pm. Roads will remain closed until after the parade has finished with all roads expected to reopen by 10pm.

These closures are expected to have a significant impact on commuter traffic, especially for the evening rush hour. Buses will be diverted around the main closures on Woodhouse Lane, and where possible those in the city centre are advised and requested to remain and enjoy the event.

Leader of Leeds City Council Councillor Keith Wakefield said:

“We are hugely excited to be staging this fantastic riders’ parade before the race begins, it will be amazing to see and I would like to thank the ASO and all the teams and riders for agreeing to take part.

“Seeing the riders parading through Leeds city centre will be wonderful and it would be brilliant to see a big crowd cheering them on and giving them a special welcome to Leeds to show how proud we are to be the host city for this year’s Tour de France.

“We recognise this is a working day and given the time of the event it will cause disruption to people’s journeys home from work. I would ask please for people to be patient and understand this is very much a special one-off, and if possible I would advise staying in the city centre and joining in the fun as it really will be something to see and be part of.”

Chief Executive of Welcome to Yorkshire Gary Verity said:

“This is a great chance for people who can’t make it to the Opening Ceremony Team Presentation to catch a glimpse of the riders as they make their way to the arena. When the teams enter the arena, we’re confident they will be blown away – as will the thousands gathered inside as we put on a spectacular show that both spectators and riders will never forget.”

For all the latest Tour de France information for Leeds visit www.leeds.gov.uk/granddepartleeds

For the latest news on Yorkshire’s Grand Départ, including travel and transport planning and guidance, visit letouryorkshire.com

Notes to editors:
In 2014, the Tour de France returns to the UK for three stages. The Yorkshire Grand Départ comprises two stages - Leeds to Harrogate and York to Sheffield - before the Tour moves south for a third stage from Cambridge to London on Monday 7 July.

ENDS
Tour de France 2014 Riders Parade – Thurs 3 July - road closure details





 

THE
EVENT ROUTE TO BE CLOSED

 


NAME OF ROAD


 


EXTENT OF ROAD AFFECTED


 


 


 


Clarendon Way


 


The Whole


Willow Terrace Road


 


The Whole


Calverley Street (southbound)


 


between Clarendon Way and Great George
Street


Portland Gate


 


The Whole


Cookridge Street


 


Between Portland Gate and Woodhouse Lane


Woodhouse Lane


 


At its junction with Clay Pit Lane


Clay Pit Lane (south-west bound)


 


Between the Inner Ring Road and Woodhouse
Lane


Merrion Way


 


The Whole


Elmwood Close


 


The Whole

 

ADDITIONAL
ROAD CLOSURES TO FACILITATE THE MOVEMENT OF THE PUBLICITY CARAVAN (as a rolling
road closure)

 


NAME OF ROAD


 


EXTENT OF ROAD AFFECTED


 


 


 


Castle Street


 


The Whole


Lisbon Street


 


The Whole


Wellington Street


 


Between Queen Street and West Street


West Street


 


Between Wellington Street and Park Lane


Park Lane


 


Between West Street and Hanover Way


Hanover Way


 


The whole


Woodhouse Square


 


The Whole


Clarendon Road


 


The Whole


Woodhouse Lane


 


Between Clarendon Road and Hyde Park Road


Rampart Road


 


Between Woodhouse Lane and Cathcart
Street

 

 

SCHEDULE
3

SUSPENSION
OF PARKING PLACES &/OR INTRODUCTION OF NO WAITING, LOADING OR UNLOADING AT
ANY TIME

 


NAME OF ROAD


 


EXTENT OF ROAD AFFECTED


 


 


 


Calverley St


 


The Whole


Portland Crescent


 


The Whole


Portland Gate


 


The Whole


Cookridge Street


 


The Whole


Clarendon Way


 


The Whole


Willow Terrace Road


 


The Whole


Merrion Way


 


The Whole


Lovell Park Road


 


Between Grafton Street and Wade Lane


Wade Lane


 


The Whole


 


 


REVOCATION
OF CURRENT ONE WAY TRAFFIC FLOW


 



NAME OF ROAD


COLUMN 2


Portland Gate


The whole

 

 



For media enquiries please contact:
Roger Boyde, Leeds City Council press office, Email: roger.boyde@leeds.gov.uk

Historic piece of Leeds protected

A historic building has been protected in the hope it can be incorporated into a future retail quarter.

Leeds City Council has negotiated with owners of Saxon Hawke House, known locally as the Lyon Works building, on Templar Street, that they will suspend demolition of the structure to make way for a temporary car park.

The agreement with owners Hammerson will see the building remain for at least 18 months while plans for the next phase of Victoria Gate are finalised – with a view that the historic structure can be incorporated into their plans.

Clearing the area and reorganising existing off-street car parking could result in an extra 145 car parking spaces. The additional spaces would replace some of those lost when the Union Street car park closed recently.

The temporary car park could operate for five years before construction begins of the second phase of Victoria Gate – Hammerson’s proposed addition to its aspirational retail and entertainment development.

Constructed in three stages between 1914 and 1937 the Lyon Works clothing factory has been deemed exempt from listed status by English Heritage meaning current owner Hammerson could demolish the structure.

But council leaders made a strong case to keep the building at a planning meeting today (Thursday 26 June). The meeting also addressed a number of other buildings which could be demolished including the old Vicar Lane Bus station.

The first phase of Victoria Gate is currently under construction across the road on East Gate and will see the largest John Lewis store in the north and the first in Leeds as well as providing an 800-space multi-story car park.

Councillor Peter Gruen, Executive Member for Neighbourhoods, Planning and Personnel, said: 

“This is a very positive development. Where our planning powers are limited we have to rely on negotiations with developers. We do not have the powers that English Heritage has to protect important buildings but we have done our upmost to secure a way forward in this case. I would like to thank Hammerson for engaging with us to come to this agreement.”

Councillor Jim McKenna who chaired this meeting of the City Plans Panel said: 

“It is always encouraging to see regeneration of the city centre, but wherever possible we are keen to ensure progress does not come at the cost of our heritage. We don’t want icons from Leeds’ history disappearing and where appropriate and possible we’ll use our planning powers to try to protect them.”

ENDS

For media enquiries please contact:
Dan Johnson,
Leeds City Council press office,
Tel 0113 247 5472
Email: daniel.johnson2@leeds.gov.uk


Future secure for First White Cloth Hall



Picture captions: [Top] how the First White Cloth Hall could look following restoration. Image courtesy of Ian Tod Architects. [Bottom] the current condition of the hall.


The secret to the city’s success as an industrial textiles powerhouse is set to see a facelift thanks to a cash-injection from the National Lottery.

Erected in 1710, the First White Cloth Hall on Lower Kirkgate was a response to news that a covered cloth market was to be built in Wakefield in a bid to tempt trade of undyed cloth away from Leeds.

The Hall was a huge success and Leeds’ dominance in the cloth trade was assured, creating the conditions for the city’s growth and prosperity from then on.

While the First White Cloth Hall itself was quickly superseded by other cloth halls, it has great historical significance for the city.

Sadly, the building itself, now a Grade II* listed building, is in a fragile state and needs considerable investment to ensure its survival. Options for its restoration are being considered by Leeds City Council.

The Lower Kirkgate Townscape Heritage Initiative (THI), supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund, aims to regenerate not only the First White Cloth Hall but other buildings on what could be the city’s oldest street.

There are several vacant properties and the THI scheme aims to provide an area for independent retail close to the busy city centre.

It is hoped the £2.4m investment will help bring close to 100 jobs back into the area and almost 3000sqm of floor space back into use.

Grants will be available for repair and restoration of shop fronts, structural issues, roofing and key architectural features. It is hoped some of the improvement works can begin this summer.

Leeds City Council executive member for Transport and the Economy councillor Richard Lewis, said:

“This funding package is a fantastic opportunity to save a building that represents a significant piece of our city’s heritage. The development of the First White Cloth Hall was a major step forward on the path to making Leeds a powerful and wealthy industrial city.

“Leeds has a strong and proud industrial heritage - restoring the First White Cloth Hall will help preserve that history for future generations to enjoy.

“But it’s not just about this building alone: the Initiative will also regenerate Lower Kirkgate, which is a centre for the independent retail sector. Leeds city centre is not just about Trinity and John Lewis -Lower Kirkgate is one of the few parts of the city that remain in need of regeneration.”

An agreement is being brokered with the owners of the First White Cloth Hall to enable work to be carried out involving safe access, surveys, conservation and archaeological investigations.

These works will help inform a feasibility study and further public consultation with the aim of helping to facilitate the eventual repair and restoration of the building.

Notes to editor

There are three types of listed status for buildings in England and Wales
• Grade I: buildings of exceptional interest,
• Grade II*: particularly important buildings of more than special interest.
• Grade II: buildings that are of special interest, warranting every effort to preserve them.

ENDS

For media enquiries please contact:
Dan Johnson,
Leeds City Council press office,
Tel 0113 247 5472
Email: daniel.johnson2@leeds.gov.uk

Cow byre at Home Farm nearly destroyed by fire reopens


Caption: Cllr Mark Dobson, with architect Scott Green from Thomasons.

A cow byre at a popular Leeds farm which was nearly destroyed following a fire has reopened to the public this month.

As part of a painstaking restoration programme undertaken at Home Farm’s cow byre, the whole of the ground floor has been refurbished and will offer a warm and welcoming environment for a range of animals. Moving into their new home this month has included Laura, the Tamworth sow and her eight piglets, along with a three lambs born at Home Farm this year, Izzy, Dizzy and Lizzy

In what also promises to be an exciting addition to the Home farm experience, a ‘pig-cam’ is set to be reinstalled, so even when the building is closed during a birth, visitors will be able to if they wish, watch all of the action live.

Also included as part of the project that was designed by architects Thomasons, visitors can see a recreated ‘Bothy’, that would have been the sleeping accommodation of single male workers at a farm during the Victorian era. The remainder of the first floor is currently not filled, and a public consultation is now underway to hear from visitors what they would like to see in the area.

Joining Councillor Mark Dobson and representatives of Thomasons at the opening were youngsters from West End Primary School.

Councillor Mark Dobson, Leeds City Council’s executive member for cleaner, safer and stronger communities said:

"It is really brilliant news that the cow byre has reopened at Home Farm following the terrible fire in 2011.

"An amazing amount of hard work has gone into making this refurbishment a reality, and I would personally like to Thomasons for overseeing both the design and delivery of the new cow byre which looks really fantastic.

"Not only can we offer a warm and welcoming environment for many of our lovely animals in the cow byre, there will also be a chance for visitors to see a recreated Victorian sleeping area that would have housed workers in the Victorian era."

Notes to editors:

Home Farm offers the opportunity to explore life on a real working farm and meet some extraordinary characters. Over 400 sheep, cattle, pigs, poultry and goats are at Temple Newsam, and there is also the chance to enjoy traditional crafts or take part in demonstrations such as butter making and blacksmithing!

Explore the cobbled yards to discover an interesting mixture of recreated workshops, exhibitions and rare breed livestock, all in the original buildings, including the historical Great Barn.

Home Farm is open 10am until 4pm (winter hours) Tuesday to Sunday inclusive. Last entry is 45 minutes before closing.

For media enquiries, please contact;
Colin Dickinson, Leeds City Council press office (0113) 39 51578
Email: colin.dickinson@leeds.gov.uk