Friday, 2 November 2012

Party house shut down by the council

Leeds City Council has closed down a ‘party house’ in east Leeds after a tenant caused months of nuisance for the neighbours.

At a hearing at Leeds Magistrates Court on Thursday 1 November the council obtained a premise closure order on 12 Southwood Road, Seacroft.  Ms Caroline Hickson, the tenant, handed back her keys and terminated her tenancy with the council on the same day.

The council had received many complaints from neighbours of serious nuisance caused by Ms Caroline Hickson and her visitors to the property. The complaints consisted of frequent parties which occurred late into the night with loud music and visitors shouting, swearing and intimidating neighbours in the street.
Leeds Anti Social Behaviour Team worked with Killingbeck Police neighbourhood policing team, Aire Valley Homes and Leeds City Council Legal Services to secure the order.
Councillor Peter Gruen, Leeds City Council, chair of the Safer Leeds and executive board member with responsibility for neighbourhoods, planning and support services said:

“This is another good example of where we have taken action to prevent a nuisance neighbour causing problems for the local area.

“The court process took only 10 days from serving the papers to the final hearing which shows that we can take fast and effective action where things quickly get out of hand in problem properties and where neighbours are prepared to come forward and report such problems.

“I hope this result will bring some relief from the problems neighbours of Ms Hickman have suffered recently.”

The property will now be closed for five weeks to allow the neighbours to get back to normal, and then the ALMO can take back the property on 5 December 2012 and arrange for it to be re-let.

Ends
For media enquiries, please contact;
Cat Milburn, Leeds City Council press office (0113) 247 4450
Email: Catherine.milburn@leeds.gov.uk

Leeds continues to support people

Leeds City Council has continued to support over 12,000 vulnerable households and over 14,000 people even with budget pressures to its Supporting People programme.

A report being presented to the council’s executive board next week (Wednesday 7 November) details the work that has been done in consultation with clients and other stakeholders to offer better services at a lower cost and how this will continue into the future.

An example of this is services for homeless people where a consultation with service users and stakeholders determined a preference to move away from hostel services to self contained dispersed accommodation with support. The new move is more flexible in terms of location, offers more stability for families and puts clients in a better position to access employment and training opportunities.

Councillor Peter Gruen, Leeds City Council executive board member with responsibility for neighbourhoods, housing and support services said:

“Since 2003, the programme has seen a reduction in central government funding of 40% but has continued to raise the quality of support provided. The service is aimed at the most vulnerable people in Leeds, including the homeless, young people, older people, people with mental health problems, women fleeing domestic violence and people with learning difficulties”

“One of our key priorities is to ensure vulnerable people across the city are being looked after and can access services that suit their needs.

“The challenge for the future is to deliver the scale and quality of services required in the context of growing demand and within the available budget.

“We have worked hard to make sure we listen to our clients and provide a services that suits their current needs.”


Notes to editors:

Supporting People (SP) is a programme of commissioned housing related support services. Up to April 2010 it was a national programme with services commissioned through a ring fenced budget with local authorities. Since April 2010 decisions and funding for SP have been devolved completely to local authorities.

In addition to the provision of suitable housing, clients are provided with a range of ‘hands on; support to build their confidence and develop their life skills. Increasingly, the programme has also focussed on getting people back into work.

Recently an extensive review of services has been undertaken in consultation with clients and stakeholders. This has resulted in the development of new service models which are more responsive, higher quality and delivered at lower cost.

Ends
For media enquiries, please contact;
Cat Milburn, Leeds City Council press office (0113) 247 4450
Email: Catherine.milburn@leeds.gov.uk

Council to consider new homes for older people in partnership with Unity Housing

Council chiefs will consider selling off a dated sheltered housing development to allow for a possible new affordable housing scheme for older people.

At a meeting of Leeds City Council’s executive board on Wednesday 7 November, councillors will be recommended to dispose of the site at Stratford Court to Unity Housing Association to allow for a new development of 30, two bedroom flats for the over 55s.

At present, Stratford Court Sheltered Housing Scheme is a 12 unit block for older tenants located in the centre of Chapel Allerton. It consists of five one-bedroom flats and seven bedsits. The scheme was built in the 1960s and is now dated with some of the accommodation offering shared bathing facilities.

As part of looking at the future of the site, three options were considered – one to decant the existing tenants and refurbish the site at a cost of £500 thousand to the council, dispose of the scheme on the open market, but this would mean losing the sheltered accommodation units or transfer the site to Unity Association to let them build new modern units.

Councillor Richard Lewis, Leeds City Council executive board for development and the economy said;

“This is a good example of how we can bring more affordable homes into the city by working with partners to provide modernised accommodation for our residents.
“We have worked with Unity on similar projects in the past, and this is great opportunity for us to add more quality homes for the over 55s to the city. "

Councillor Peter Gruen, Leeds City Council executive board member with responsibility for neighbourhoods, planning and support services said:
“This site has become dated and it is important that we look at how we can bring it up to a much more reasonable standard of housing.

“Our main concern will be the comfort and well being of our residents who are currently living at the site, and we will be looking at how best to rehouse them with the least amount of hassle should this scheme be agreed at executive board.”


Ends
For media enquiries, please contact;
Cat Milburn, Leeds City Council press office (0113) 247 4450
Email: Catherine.milburn@leeds.gov.uk